On a recent trip to London, armed with a number of restaurant / food market recommendations, I had the chance to sample two great brunch dishes at Counter Café. This website describes their (mostly with eggs) dishes in this manner and I love it “If Counter Cafe could lay eggs, it would.”

The atmosphere is calm and relaxed, and since it is used as a space for artists, feels a little like an unpretentious exhibition space as you enter. If the weather is agreeable, you can even sit outside beside the canal (the café is on Fish Island after all).

We ordered Eggs Benedict and Turkish Eggs to share, and the Turkish eggs were particularly divine. So much so that I decided to emulate them today, almost without consciously copying the dish. I guess the recipe entered the subconscious of my taste buds… 😉

Turkish Eggs from Counter Café

Turkish Eggs from Counter Café

Eggs Benedict with ham at Counter Café.

Eggs Benedict with ham at Counter Café.

Turkish Eggs for two

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You will need:

1 large onion, finely chopped

1 can plain tomato sauce

3 cloves of garlic, roughly slices

2-3 peppers, different colours, sliced

2 teaspoons capers or according to taste

100ml water

a dash of apple cider vinegar or teaspoon of sugar

2 eggs

coriander to garnish (optional)

Bread for serving (optional)

How to make it:

In a wide deep pan, fry the onion in a little olive or sunflower oil and as it gets translucent add the garlic. Be careful not to let it brown, add some tomato sauce if necessary and stir to avoid sticking.

Add the peppers and continue stirring, then add the tomato sauce, apple cider vinegar, and water. Lower the flame, add the capers, and cover. Cook for 20 minutes on a low flame, it will be bubbling but not boiling over.

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Carefully crack two eggs into your pan, trying not to break the yolks, and keeping them separate as much as possible. Place the lid back on, and let the egg cook for about 10 minutes, or according to taste.

Garnish with chopped coriander, and serve with fresh or toasted bread.

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This recipe is similar to the Maltese Balbuljata (recipes differ in different families!) or the Israeli Tunisian Shakshuka.


Comments are appreciated.. say your bit!